Tropical Storm Kay could bring a YEAR of rain to drought-stricken Southern California

Tropical Storm Kay may bring rainfall for a year to help southern California’s relentless drought, while Hurricane Earl is expected to provide strong rip currents on the east coast.

Hurricane Kay is heading north of the Baja California coast as the category one storm is expected to bring heavy rain and flooding as it moves into Southern California.

The forecasted weather in southern counties, including San Diego, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Los Angeles, will be a week-long break from the scorching heatwave as the heaviest amount of rainfall is expected on Friday and Saturday.

For the next 36 hours, cities in Southern California as far as Los Angeles and extending inland and into Arizona will be the most vulnerable to flooding. The eastern San Diego and Palm Springs area will see the highest amount of rainfall, according to The Weather Channel.

With temperatures dropping in some areas from 100F to around 80F, the weekend forecast could also benefit firefighters fighting ongoing fires in Los Angeles, Riverside and San Diego counties, but the forecast winds can also worsen the weather. conditions.

Thunderstorms and gusts of wind are also expected as Kay is moving with winds of 60 miles per hour along the coast of Mexico.

Meanwhile, on the east coast, locals can expect strong winds and strong tides as Hurricane Earl churns off Bermuda.

Hurricane Kay could bring rainfall for a year in Southern California as the state suffers from a persistent drought

Heavy rain is expected in Southern California as the storm moves north from Mexico's Baja California.  The rain will reach Los Angeles County and head towards Palm Springs

Heavy rain is expected in Southern California as the storm moves north from Mexico’s Baja California. The rain will reach Los Angeles County and head towards Palm Springs

Most of Southern California will be under flood control as rain starts raining on Friday leading up to the weekend

Most of Southern California will be under flood control as rain starts raining on Friday leading up to the weekend

The area most vulnerable to flooding will be East San Diego, which leads inland to Palm Springs

The area most vulnerable to flooding will be East San Diego, which leads inland to Palm Springs

The counties will also be on wind alert as the storm continues north

The counties will also be on wind alert as the storm continues north

Although the winds will be the strongest in Mexico, they are expected to slowly project into California

Although the winds will be the strongest in Mexico, they are expected to slowly project into California

California residents can expect winds as early as Friday morning

California residents can expect winds as early as Friday morning

The weather will be a change from the week-long heatwave California endured

The weather will be a change from the week-long heatwave California endured

Earl continues to be a threat as it approaches Category 3 status with no slowdown forecast on Friday as its effects react on the east coast, but conditions are expected to improve by Saturday.

East Coast residents can expect “rip currents” and “life threatening surfing” in the coming days as winds pick up, according to The Weather Channel.

The sustained winds in Bermuda are about 100 miles per hour with “higher gusts,” according to the National Hurricane Center. The winds are expected to pick up until Friday night and weaken until Monday.

Despite the storm’s distance, meteorological experts warn of impacts that will reach the United States.

“Hurricane Earl is just such a hurricane,” the Meteorological Service said. “The biggest coastal impacts will be in the Mid Atlantic and Northeast until this weekend.”

Strong currents are expected in Carolina through Sunday as the tropical storm moves northeast.

Precipitation is also expected along the coast with the potential for flooding in New York, Atlantic City, Norfolk and Charleston.

Conditions should improve by Sunday.

On the east coast, Hurricane Earl is expected to have an impact as fears persist that the storm will reach a Category Three hurricane

On the east coast, Hurricane Earl is expected to have an impact as fears persist that the storm will reach a Category Three hurricane

Coastal floods are a threat from New York to Charleston as the storm continues to get stronger

Coastal floods are a threat from New York to Charleston as the storm continues to get stronger

East Coast residents should be prepared for heavy rains and dangerous rip currents

East Coast residents should be prepared for heavy rains and dangerous rip currents

Conditions are expected to subside by Monday

Conditions are expected to subside by Monday

Hurricane Kay killed three people, including a child, in the southwestern state of Guerrero, Mexico. Two of the victims were in a car that was run over by the flooded waters after the driver attempted to cross a stream.

A child was found dead inside a house after being hit by a collapsed fence. Several houses were also damaged.

Mexican airlines VivaAerobus, Volaris and Aeromexico have also been induced to cancel domestic flights to the popular tourist destination Los Cabos.

A hurricane warning was issued for a sparsely populated stretch of the peninsula around Bahia Asuncion, and the Baja California Sur state government announced it was opening shelters for people who need to evacuate. It said that some streams were already rising and closed some roads.

While the rains could be a miracle as it heads towards Southern California, the area hasn’t been hit by a major storm since Hurricane Nora was downgraded to a tropical storm in 1997. Heavy rains cut off electricity to Los Angeles and San Diego flooded.

Strong waves hit the coast of Los Cabos, Mexico on Wednesday, a day before Hurricane Kay swept up the country's Pacific coast and lost strength despite a maximum sustained wind of 87 mph.

Strong waves hit the coast of Los Cabos, Mexico on Wednesday, a day before Hurricane Kay swept up the country’s Pacific coast and lost strength despite a maximum sustained wind of 87 mph.

Strong waves and heavy rains caused damage to El Paraiso, a beach town in the Mexican state of Colima

Strong waves and heavy rains caused damage to El Paraiso, a beach town in the Mexican state of Colima

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