The shaking face and pink heart are among the new emojis coming to your phone over the next year

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Emoji fans rejoice – the pink heart is finally added to the smartphone keyboard!

This is one of 31 brand new emojis that have just been approved by The Unicode Consortium, the body for character standardization in writing systems around the world.

The new Emoji 15.0 set also includes a shaking face (I’m shaken), a moose, a ginger stalk, the Wi-Fi symbol and a couple of maracas.

There are also new Hand Pushing Right and Hand Pushing Left emojis, each available in five different skin tones.

Unfortunately, you won’t be able to implement them in your group chats yet, as Apple-owned platforms, Google, and Meta must first implement them in their software.

Google and Android platforms are likely to release support for new emojis between October and December, while iPhone and Samsung users may have to wait until next year.

The new Emoji 15.0 set, officially announced today, includes a shaking face, moose, ginger stem, Wi-Fi symbol and a pair of maracas

Other inclusions in Emoji 15.0 are donkey, jellyfish, toothpick, pea pod, moose, donkey and a khanda (pictured) - the symbol of the Sikh faith

The pink heart (left) has been one of the “most talked about absences on the emoji keyboard” since 2016, Emojipedia said. Other inclusions in Emoji 15.0 are donkey, jellyfish, toothpick, pea pod, moose, donkey and a khanda (pictured) – the symbol of the Sikh faith

There are also ten new skin tone editing sequences - five each for the new Hand Pushing Right and Hand Pushing Left emojis.

There are also ten new skin tone editing sequences – five each for the new Hand Pushing Right and Hand Pushing Left emojis.

NEW EMOJI ACCEPTED FOR EMOJI 15.0

  • Face trembling
  • Blue heart
  • Gray heart
  • Pink heart
  • Hand pushing left (in five skin tones + standard yellow)
  • Hand pushing right (in five skin tones + standard yellow)
  • Elk
  • Donkey
  • Wing
  • Black bird
  • Goose
  • Jellyfish
  • Hyacinth
  • Ginger root
  • Pea pod
  • Folding fan
  • Choose your hair
  • Maracas
  • Flute
  • Khanda
  • Wireless (Wi-Fi symbol)

Other new emojis in the updated set include a donkey, angel wing, jellyfish, black bird, goose, hyacinth flower, and pea pod.

A folding fan, a toothpick, a flute, the khanda – the symbol of the Sikh faith – and both blue and gray hearts.

Several other colors of hearts and different versions of pink hearts are already available.

These include a growing pink heart, two hearts, heart with arrow, heart with ribbon, and beating heart.

However, users have been desperately asking for a single light pink heart to be added to use in their text conversations, so they will be thrilled with the update.

A Twitter user said: ‘the pink heart emoji is on the way … for many on the tl [timeline] this is historical ‘.

Another said, “After a billion years, we’re finally getting a pink heart emoji.”

Companies apply stylized versions of consortium projects to their operating systems.

A few hours after the announcement, Google released the new emojis in its Noto font, so developers can easily incorporate them into their designs.

However, they can only be used as part of a keyboard when the platform is able to support them.

Emojipedia, a go-to website for emojis, predicts they won’t be supported on Facebook and Twitter until 2023.

No new emojis were included in iOS 16, which was released on Monday.

Users have been desperately asking for a single light pink heart to be added to use in their text conversations, so they are thrilled with the update

Users have been desperately asking for a single light pink heart to be added to use in their text conversations, so they are thrilled with the update

A few hours after the announcement, Google released the new emojis in its Noto font, so developers can easily incorporate them into their projects.

A few hours after the announcement, Google released the new emojis in its Noto font, so developers can easily incorporate them into their projects.

With the exception of the skin tone change sequences, each of the 20 emojis have also been approved as characters encoded as part of Unicode 15.0.

In addition to the 20 emojis, the updated Unicode 15.0 contains two new scripts – Kawi and Nag Mundari – with 86 and 42 characters respectively.

Also included are 4,193 new Chinese, Japanese and Korean ideographs, as well as Kaktovik numerals, used in the Inuit and Yupik languages.

Other new symbols include a nine-pointed white star – used by members of the Bahá’í Faith – and eight representing celestial bodies.

According to The Unicode Consortium, twenty-nine additional controls on the format of the Egyptian hieroglyph will allow Egyptologists to better represent the texts.

In addition to the 20 emojis, the updated Unicode 15.0 contains two new scripts - Kawi and Nag Mundari (pictured) - with 86 and 42 characters respectively

Other new symbols include a nine-pointed white star (pictured) - used by members of the Bahá'í Faith - and eight representing celestial bodies

In addition to the 20 emojis, the updated Unicode 15.0 contains two new scripts – Kawi and Nag Mundari (left) – with 86 and 42 characters respectively. Other new symbols include a nine-pointed white star (right) – used by members of the Bahá’í Faith – and eight representing celestial bodies

The new emojis are chosen with the help of the general public, who can submit an application for a particular icon to the Unicode Consortium.

To be considered, the candidate emoji must have multiple uses, be used in sequences, open new horizons, be distinctive, be compatible, and be used frequently, according to Unicode.

Although submissions are no longer accepted for Emoji 16.0, the upcoming release, there is a particular type of emoji that will never be considered: flags.

In a blog explaining the decision, Jennifer Daniel, chair of the Unicode Emoji Subcommittee, wrote: “Emoji flags have always been subject to special criteria due to their open nature, infrequent use and implementation burden.

‘Today nine out of ten are among the top twenty most shared flags. (The only outlier is Russia.)

‘Adding more flags and thousands of valid sequences into the Unicode standard hasn’t led to wider adoption.

“They are not standing still, they are constantly evolving and, due to the open nature of the flags, the addition of one creates exclusivity at the expense of the others.”

‘PREGNANT MAN’ IS INCLUDED IN THE LIST OF NEW EMOJI FOR 2022

Two emojis – “pregnant man” and a gender neutral “pregnant person” – are among those included in the most recent list of approved emojis, 14.0.

The pregnant man and the pregnant person acknowledge that “pregnancy is possible for some transgender men and non-binary people,” says Emojipedia, a voting member of the Unicode Consortium.

Men get pregnant in both real life and fiction, says Emojipedia, like Arnold Schwarzenegger in the 1994 film “Junior”.

The emojis “Pregnant man” and “pregnant person” could also be used as “an ironic way to show a baby to eat, a very full stomach caused by eating a large meal.

Guidelines for using the term “pregnant person” instead of “pregnant woman” – as issued by the British Medical Association in 2017, in an attempt to recognize trans and non-binary people – were at the time called “an insult to women”.

Jane Solomon, Emojipedia’s “senior emoji lexicographer,” outlined the new emojis in a blog post titled “Why is there a pregnant man emoji?”

“The new pregnancy options can be used for impersonation by trans men, non-binary people or women with short hair, although obviously, the use of these emojis is not limited to these groups,” she said.

‘Men can be pregnant. This applies to the real world (e.g., trans men) and fictional universes (e.g., Arnold Schwarzenegger in [1994 film] “Junior”.

‘People of any sex can also be pregnant. There are now emojis to represent this. ‘

For now, Unicode retains the more conventional “pregnant woman” emoji, which has been an emoji since 2016.

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